GB Bloom Day in May

in the pleatpetal purring of mouthweathered May.

Karen Volkman, from “May

The Chinese tree peonies are definitely the stars this month in the Speilhaus garden of the University of Hohenheim.

Bloom Day, 2016,enclos*ure

I took these photos yesterday evening.

The garden has around ten mature specimens.

Paeonia Suffruticosa Hybrid ‘Yoshinogawa’

Paeonia-Suffruticosa-Hybride 'Yoshinogawa'
Paeonia Suffruticosa Hybrid ‘Yoshinogawa’

Unfortunately, we had several days of rain last week, and the blooms were not at their best.

Paeonia tenuifolia 'Plena'
Paeonia tenuifolia ‘Plena’

The fern leaf peony shown above was new to me.

Looking across the garden to the Spielhaus.

Beyond the peony bed, I liked the combination, above and below, of light-purple geraniums and orange euphorbias.

Geranium tuberosum and
Geranium tuberosum and Euphorbia griffithii ‘Fire Glow’

Euphoribia griffithii 'Fire Glow'
Euphoribia griffithii ‘Fire Glow’
Iris Barbata-Media-Grpuppe 'Antarctique'
Iris Barbata-Media-Grpuppe ‘Antarctique’

Nearby was a planting of bearded iris.

In the photo above, the bright yellow at the top, just below the arbor, is mountain goldenbanner, which is native to the western United States.

Thermopsis montana
Thermopsis montana or mountain goldenbanner
Asphodelus albus
Asphodelus albus

White asphodel  — “that greeny flower” — was also blooming in the garden.

The pretty blue-violet flower above was close by, but I didn’t get a picture of its label.  I think it’s another Asphodelus. It’s a Camassia, a North American native in the asparagus family (see the comments below).

Looking south across the garden from behind the wisteria arbor, you can see the row of tree peonies.  In the lower right-hand corner is a planting of yellow asphodel or king’s spear.

Asphodelus lutea

Looking across the garden from the east to the west, a beautiful pink blooming Judas tree draws the eye.

The tree is native to Southern Europe and Western Asia.

The flowers are edible and are said to have a sweetish-acid taste.

At the other side of the garden a Lithospermum purpurocaeruleum or purple gromwell drapes over the steps. The flowers emerge purple reddish and then mature to deep blue.

A last look from the northeast. At mid-month, the wisteria on the arbor (right side) has only a few blooms.

To see what’s blooming today for other garden bloggers, please visit Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

11 thoughts on “GB Bloom Day in May

  1. That Geranium is new to me. It’s listed under bulbs by VanEngelen. Also the Judas Tree is a Cercis which is the same family as Redbud and the flowers look very similar. Such a lot of great plants and I love those long views with all the combinations. That blue flower might be a Cammassia (spelling?) which is a native plant to the U.S. for moist or boggy areas.

  2. Many lovely things to look at here, but that ‘Yoshinogawa’ peony is spectacular. It is easy to see why this plant became a favorite subject in Japanese art.

  3. […] I started out in March meaning to track the flowers of the Spielhaus (playhouse) perennial garden at the University of Hohenheim for this year’s GB Bloom Days. However, travel, gloomy weather, and hurting feet have interfered, and I haven’t posted an update since May. […]

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