The Sunday porch: Sogn, Norway

Cafe in Norway, 1898 to 1904, flickr CommonsPossibly a café, Sogn area, Norway, between 1897 and 1904, by Nils Olsson Reppen, via Fylkesarkivet (County Archives) i Sogn go Fjordane Commons on flickr.

Across the road, the sign on the house reads, “Logi for reisende. Udsalg av mad, Kaffe og Brus” (“Lodging for travellers. Sale of food, coffee and fizzy lemonade”).

Click the image for a larger view.

The Sunday porch: le bricolage

Terrace and canvas cover, France, Bibliotheque de Toulouse, flickr“Famille attablée sur la terrasse, ombragée par une bâche,” (family at a table on a terrace, shaded by a tarp) ca. 1890 – ca. 1910, by Eugène Trutat*, via Bibliothèque de Toulouse (cropped slightly by me).


*I was skeptical about the photographer because Trutat died in 1910, and the women on the left appear to be in the shorter dresses of the 1920s or 30s. However, they could be wearing the bathing suits of around 1900.

The Sunday porch: ice cream

Day Brothers Ice Cream, nypl.digitalcollections“Waiters at Day and Brothers Ice Cream Saloon,” 1880, Ocean Grove, New Jersey, by William H. Stauffer, via Robert Dennis Collection of Stereoscopic Views, The New York Public Library.

Waiters and ice cream, NY Public Library

The image is not very clear, but it looks like a fun place. The same company still exists at the location shown above as Day’s Ice Cream. It is Ocean Grove‘s oldest continuously operating business.

Life in gardens: family and friends

Västra Götaland, Lysekil, Lysekil, Bohuslän, Övrigt-Sällskapsliv

Människor som sitter i en trädgård” (people sitting in a garden), Lysekil, Sweden, ca. 1890, a cyanotype by Carl Curman, via Swedish National Heritage Board Commons on flickr.

Carl Curman was a physician, specializing in the science of health baths (balneology).  He also became a prominent amateur photographer, leaving behind a collection of about 700 photos.  He lived with his wife, Calla (possibly the first person on the left above), and their children in Stockholm and, during the summers, in the seaside town of Lyskil.

The group above may be in an outdoor cafe of the park in Lyskil, rather than in a private garden. The spot looks very much like the one in this photo by Curman.

The Sunday porch: conditori

Copenhagen cafe, OSU on flickr“Outdoor Restaurant,” Copenhagen, ca. 1915, via Oregon State University Special Collections & Archives on flickr. The image is from a collection of lantern slides of the “Visual Instruction Department.”

The accompanying bit of the class lecture observed that “[European] eating places have less of the haste and nervous tension which characterize cafeterias and cafes in American cities. In Copenhagen it is common for tables to be set out under an awning on the broad sidewalk. Here folk can eat leisurely and watch the happenings in the neighborhood.”

In the lettering above the tables, “og Conditori” means “and cake/pastry shop.” There’s another cake shop with nice outdoor seating (in Sweden) here.

I used to mock my father and his chums
for getting up early on Sunday morning
and drinking coffee at a local spot
but now I’m one of those chumps.

Edward Hirsch, from “Early Sunday Morning