In a vase on Monday: amaryllis and berries

Cut amaryllis flowers from the grocery store and nice orange berries from the ugly euonymus in the front yard.

I like orange and pink at Christmas.

The amaryllis started out long-stemmed — although not so long as these — but I cut them down as they started to fade a little after a week.

To see what other bloggers have put in a vase today, please visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.

Mandarin, Florida

Harriet Beecher Stowe, her husband, and guests on the porch of her home in Mandarin (Jacksonville), Florida, 1875, via Robert N. Dennis Collection of Stereoscopic Views, The New York Public Library Digital Collections. (Click on the image for a larger view.)

The author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin and 30 other books bought her Florida house soon after the Civil War ended. At the time of this photo, she was there seeking refuge from the publicity accompanying the civil trial for adultery of her equally famous preacher brother, Henry Ward Beecher.

There is another view of the house (no longer standing) here.

The flower seller: Amritsar

Selling flowers to Sikh pilgrims at the Golden Temple Amritsar, India, January 15, 1914, by Stéphane Passet, via Archives of the Planet Collection – Albert Kahn Museum /Département des Hauts-de-Seine.

This autochrome is one of about seventy-two thousand that were commissioned and then archived by Albert Kahn, a wealthy French banker who was committed to the ideal of universal peace and who believed that “knowledge of foreign cultures encourages respect and peaceful relations between nations.”* He was also acutely aware that the 20th century was going to bring rapid material change to the world.

Accordingly, from 1909 to 1931, Kahn sent thirteen photographers and filmmakers to 50 countries “to fix, once and for all, aspects, practices, and modes of human activity whose fatal disappearance is no longer ‘a matter of time.’”† The resulting collection is called Archives de la Planète and now resides in its own museum at Kahn’s old suburban estate at Boulogne-Billancourt, just west of Paris. Since June 2016, the archive has also been available for viewing online here.


*Collections Albert-Kahn website. Also, the above photo (A 4 214) is © Collection Archives de la Planète – Musée Albert-Kahn and used under its terms, here.
†words of Albert Kahn, 1912.

Fontainebleau

Part of the formal garden of the Château de Fontainebleau, with the Grand Canal barely visible in the distance, Ile-de-France, France, between 1914 and 1925. This is a glass lantern slide by Williams, Brown & Earle, Inc., via Archives of American Gardens, Garden Club of America Collection, Smithsonian Institution (used here by permission).

The Archives holds over 60,000 photos and records documenting 6,300 historic and contemporary American gardens.  At its core are almost 3,000 hand-colored glass lantern and 35mm slides donated by the Garden Club of America, which is the source of this image.

(Click on the picture to enlarge it.)