Milkweed

A repeat post from 2012. . .

Milkweed,” 1900, by Mary Frances Carpenter Paschallvia Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

This photo was part of a large group of “artistic photographs,” primarily by early women photographers, that was donated to the Library of Congress by Frances Benjamin Johnston. In the spring of 1900, she had used some of these images in an exhibition of work by American women photographers at the Exposition Universelle Internationale in Paris.

. . . I look down now. It is all changed.
Whatever it was I lost, whatever I wept for
Was a wild, gentle thing, the small dark eyes
Loving me in secret.
It is here. At a touch of my hand,
The air fills with delicate creatures
From the other world.

James Wright, from “Milkweed

The Sunday porch: Gee’s Bend

A repeat post from September 2013. . .
“Jorena Pettway and her daughter making [a] chair cover out of bleached flour sacks and flower decorations from paper. She also made the chairs and practically all the furniture in the house.”*

The photo was taken in Gee’s Bend [Boykin], Alabama, 1939, by Marion Post Wolcott, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Gee’s Bend is an African-American community located in a large bend of the Alabama River. It became famous about 15 years ago for its remarkable quilts.

In 1816, Joseph Gee brought slaves to the area and started a cotton plantation, which was sold in 1845 to the Pettway family. After the Civil War, the farm’s freed slaves remained on the land as sharecroppers, and many took the last name of Pettway.

In the winter of 1932-33, the community’s particular isolation — with only a small ferry to the east and a bad road to the west — and its dire poverty came to the attention of the Red Cross, which sent it a boatload of flour and meal.   It began receiving Resettlement Agency assistance in 1935, and the Agency purchased the plantation in 1937. By 1939, when the Farm Security Administration sent Wolcott to take photos, there had been a number of improvements, including new homes (like the one pictured above).

In 1962, when residents began trying to register to vote, the local government eliminated the ferry service, which connected Gee’s Bend to the county seat of Camden. Without it, people of the community had to drive more than an hour to reach the town. The ferry service remained closed until 2006.

In 2002, an exhibition of quilts made by the women of Gee’s Bend opened at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston and then traveled to the Whitney Museum in New York City. Another show in Houston and at the Smithsonian Institution followed in 2006. The New York Times art critic, Michael Kimmelman, called the quilts on display “some of the most miraculous works of modern art America has produced.”


*Library of Congress caption, possibly written by Wolcott.

Lucky ducks

A repeat post from 2014. . .
Garden pavilion over a duck and goose pond, unknown location, ca. 1900, Phillips Glass Plate Negative Collection, via Powerhouse Museum (Sydney, Australia) Commons on flickr.

I would love to see the rest of this property.

[I]t is more important for the gardener to be enchanted than for the critics to be pleased.

— Henry Mitchell, from The Essential Earthman

Bedford, New York

A corner of the Whitman Garden, Bedford, New York, between 1914 and 1949, a hand-colored glass lantern slide by an unknown photographer,* via Archives of American Gardens, Garden Club of America Collection, Smithsonian Institution (used here by permission).

There are four more images of this garden here. It was designed by landscape architect Robert Ludlow, Jr.

The Archives holds over 60,000 photos and records documenting 6,300 historic and contemporary American gardens.  At its core are almost 3,000 hand-colored glass lantern and 35mm slides donated by the Garden Club of America, which is the source of this image.

(Click on the picture to enlarge it.)


*The slide manufacturer was Edward Van Altena.