The sprinkler

Dorothy and Shirley Hick playing with a sprinkler in their back garden, Northcote, Melbourne, Australia, 1949, by Emily Hick, via Museums Victoria Collections (under CC license).

The photo was archived as part of Melbourne’s Biggest Family Album in 2006.

Dorothy remembers on hot days they would put the sprinkler on and play, as there were no swimming pools. They wore “horrible knitted woollen bathers, they soaked up the water and got heavy and baggy.” The ladder against the tree was to pick apricots “which were so ripe and juicy the juice would run down your chin.”

— Museums Victoria online catalogue

You can click on the image for a better view.

Ferntree Gully

A forester’s cottage, Ferntree GullyDandenong Ranges, Victoria, Australia, ca. 1900, a glass lantern slide by Archibald James Campbell, via Museums Victoria Collections.

I like the two log pillars at the bottom of the steps, each topped by a potted plant.

During the 19th century, the forests of the Dandenong mountains were a major source of timber for Melbourne.

The Sunday porch: Dubbo

“Portrait of four girls and a man on a verandah,” Dubbo area, New South Wales, ca. 1915, by Edward Challis Kempevia National Library of Australia Commons on flickr.

I wonder if those are scented geraniums in the planter on the left?

The Rev. E.C. Kempe was an amateur photographer and principal of the Brotherhood of the Good Shepherd at Dubbo from 1912 to 1915. The Good Shepherd was one of several “Bush Brotherhoods,” Anglican religious orders that sent traveling priests to thinly populated rural districts. “They were described as a ‘band of men’ who could ‘preach like Apostles’ and ‘ride like cowboys’,” according to Wikipedia. Kempe left behind an album of 157 photographs from his time in the bush.