Les Mées, France


Women resting after working in a garden or vineyard, Les Mées, Basses-Alpes, France, April 13, 1916, by Georges Chevalier, via Archives of the Planet Collection – Albert Kahn Museum /Départment of Hauts-de-Seine.

I love their hats. Les Mées is in Haute or upper Provence.  The area — very dry and hot — is one of the least densely populated in France.

This autochrome is one of about seventy-two thousand that were commissioned and then archived by Albert Kahn, a wealthy French banker and pacifist, between 1909 and 1931. Kahn sent thirteen photographers and filmmakers to fifty countries “to fix, once and for all, aspects, practices, and modes of human activity whose fatal disappearance is no longer ‘a matter of time.'”* The resulting collection is called Archives de la Planète and now resides in its own museum at Kahn’s old suburban estate at Boulogne-Billancourt, just west of Paris. Since June 2016, the archive has also been available for viewing online here.


*words of Albert Kahn, 1912. Also, the above photo (A 7 954) is © Collection Archives de la Planète – Musée Albert-Kahn and used under its terms, here.

The Sunday porch: Cascadia, Oregon

Hotel in Cascadia, Oregon, 1925, via Gerald W. Williams Collection, OSU (Oregon State University) Special Collections & Archives Commons on flickr.

I love that rustic bench on the right side of the porch. (Click on the image to enlarge it.)

George Geisendorfer opened a resort at Cascadia Springs in 1896, offering what he called the “curative powers” of the local mineral spring water. The resort included a hotel, garden, croquet course, tennis courts, and bowling alley. After the hotel burned, the 300-acre property was acquired by the state of Oregon and is now the site of Cascadia State Park.

At that moment

Postcard of family in the garden, ca. 1905, via pellethepoet on flickr (under CC license)Pelle’s notes say it was purchased from an eBay seller in Tramore, Waterford, Ireland.

The low-hanging hammock on the left swayed right at the moment the shutter clicked. There are actually two women in the hammock, and there’s a strange blur behind it in the center — probably a child running past. The girl on the grass has tumbled (out of the hammock?), and her legs are up.  On the left, the blond girl on the bench has noticed and looks about to laugh.

For a better look, click on the picture — or on “via” above and then on the larger image there.

Barcaldine, Queensland

“Residence with goat in Yew Street, Barcaldine, Queensland,” ca. 1910, photographer unknown, via State Library of Queensland Commons on flickr.

The man and boy are showing off the goat and cart. A woman on the porch is holding up a painting.

In 1891, the Great Shearers Strike was held in Barcaldine under the boughs of The Tree Of Knowledge. The event led to the formation of the Australian Labor Party. The streets in the town are all named after species of trees.