Vintage landscape: allée

wwi-british-trench-nationaal-archief-on-flickrOfficial photo of the recent English progress at the Western Front. A well hidden trench,” between 1914 and 1918, via Nationaal Archief (of the Netherlands) Commons on flickr.

It occurred to me that some, or a lot, of the wattle could have been woven by men who were gardeners before the war.

WWI trenches were not actually straight, but zigzagged to prevent enemy soldiers from firing down the axis. They were normally about 4 m. (12′) deep.

Life in gardens: when the prince has no porch

frederick-i-of-baden-ca-1900-by-queen-victoria-of-sweden-tekniska-museet
. . . a rather awkward arrangement.

“Society at dining table. Frederick I of Baden sits in the middle,” location unknown, ca. 1890 – 1907, by Queen Victoria of Sweden, via Tekniska museet (Sweden) on flickr, under CC license.

Victoria (or Viktoria) of Baden — Queen of Sweden after 1907 — was the daughter of Frederick I. She married Crown Prince Gustaf in 1881, and they had three children, but it was not a happy marriage. From 1882, she spent almost every winter in Egypt and Italy, mostly in Capri. She was a good amateur photographer, as well as a painter and sculptor.

The Sunday porch: Savannah

west-ave-savannah-ga-1979-habs-library-of-congressWest Park Avenue, Victorian Historic District, Savannah, Georgia, 1979, by Walter Smalling, Jr. for an Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The house still stands, apparently in good condition, with only small changes to the woodwork since the time of the HABS.

The winter garden: Iceland

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The living room of Sigurjóns, carpenter, and his wife, Elin, at Vonarstræti 8, Iceland (possibly Reykjavik), between 1910 and 1930, by Magnús Ólafssonvia The Reykjavik Museum of Photography Commons on flickr (both photos).

I believe you can just see Sigurjóns beyond the doorway in one of the images. Elin must be the woman in traditional dress, and the other woman may be their daughter.

I don’t know if this photo was really taken in winter or not, although the tulips on the table could have come from a greenhouse in February.

Vintage landscape: Hood River, Oregon

hood-river-oregon-arthur-peck-osu-special-collections-and-archives“Good enough Farm House in Hood River, [Oregon]: View from front yard,” undated, via Arthur Peck Photograph Collection, OSU Special Collections and Archives Commons on flickr.

Arthur Peck was a Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Oregon Agricultural College from 1908 to 1948. This picture was part of his teaching library of 24 boxes of glass lantern slides — now in OSU’s archives.

It is not clear whether “good enough” was his critical evaluation or the name of the farm.