November Bloom Day: early summer

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Technically, because Kigali is a few degrees south of the equator, it is early summer here.

But  — given that the temperature is almost always in the 70ºs or low 80ºs — it is more relevant that we are almost three months into the end-of-the-year rainy season.

In late October, I came back from five weeks in the U.S. to rampant growth in all the planting beds.  Now, I need to wade in and do some serious cutting back all over.

To see what’s blooming for other garden bloggers, visit Carol at May Dreams Gardens here.

Bloom Day in November: dill(flowers) and sunflowers

The quiet flowerworks in the mind of God . . .

Howard Nemerov, from “A Sprig of Dill

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ure

A dillburst in the flower borders.

During the summer, I transplanted a lot of small dill plants from the vegetable garden to the yellow areas of the flower borders.  Unfortunately, dill really doesn’t like to be moved, and it really doesn’t like it during the dry season.  So all the little plants just remained little.

But lately, after six weeks of rain, they are growing and a few have begun to bloom.

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ureI’ve always thought that dill is a nice ornamental plant.

Eventually, that variegated ginger — of which you can just see a bit  above and below — will be huge and dominate this area (and there is another very small one hidden to the left of the dill bloom below).

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ure

In the meantime, I’m hoping that the dill and Missouri primrose will self seed here as long as there is space.  (I will help it along, and I’ve also been sprinkling about Verbena bonariensis seed.)

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ureI was pleased to get the picture above.  The yellow of the primroses is usually too intense for my camera to capture any details.

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ureAbove, the dill blooms/seadheads are beautiful even as they fade to tan.

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ureIn our vegetable garden, the dillworks continue. . . .

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ureIn the background are blue-green Russian kale.  Some of the next batch that I grow will also go into the flower beds — like these at the Smithsonian’s Butterfly Habitat Garden.

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ure

This Bloom Day, I also got interested in the after- blooms of our sunflowers.November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ure

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ure

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ure

Below is what one of them looked like at the end of summer.

November Bloom Day in our Rwanda garden/enclos*ure

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is the 15th day of every month. To see what’s blooming in other garden bloggers’ gardens, please visit Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

Bloom Day in July: tropical hibiscus

About 8:30 this morning:
Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

Five hours later:
Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

Well. . . aloha.
Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

This is the second bloom I’ve seen on this particular tropical hibiscus. None of my others are this flashy dramatic.

Surrounding it are several Justicia brandegeeana or shrimp plants, which are always in bloom.

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

This is a small planting bed near the entrance to the front terrace. We removed* all the old clipped shrubs from this area early last summer, but in a combination of fatigue and indecision, I just cut this bush to the ground, thinking it could die (or not) in place.

A couple of months ago, I noticed that it had sent up two stems and that flower buds were developing.  I was a little amazed about a week and a half ago when the first one opened.

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

It goes well with the shrimp plants, so I’ll just leave it here and keep it pruned to about 4′ – 5′ tall.  The yellow-flowering plant in front of it is a Missouri primrose (Oenothera missouriensis).  It is an American native annual that self-seeds around the garden.

Cactus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

On the opposite end of the showy-ness scale, I discovered last week that our cactus-like Euphorbia (above and below) is blooming.

Cactus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

The flowers are a little over a 1/4″ across.

Cactus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

Cactus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

GBBD — the 15th of every month — is hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Click here to see other garden bloggers’ mid-July flowers.


*It was among the bushes on the right in this photo. It was always clipped, so it probably hasn’t bloomed for a long time.