Bloom Day in July: tropical hibiscus

About 8:30 this morning:
Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

Five hours later:
Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

Well. . . aloha.
Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

This is the second bloom I’ve seen on this particular tropical hibiscus. None of my others are this flashy dramatic.

Surrounding it are several Justicia brandegeeana or shrimp plants, which are always in bloom.

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

This is a small planting bed near the entrance to the front terrace. We removed* all the old clipped shrubs from this area early last summer, but in a combination of fatigue and indecision, I just cut this bush to the ground, thinking it could die (or not) in place.

A couple of months ago, I noticed that it had sent up two stems and that flower buds were developing.  I was a little amazed about a week and a half ago when the first one opened.

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day in July, tropical hibiscus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

It goes well with the shrimp plants, so I’ll just leave it here and keep it pruned to about 4′ – 5′ tall.  The yellow-flowering plant in front of it is a Missouri primrose (Oenothera missouriensis).  It is an American native annual that self-seeds around the garden.

Cactus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

On the opposite end of the showy-ness scale, I discovered last week that our cactus-like Euphorbia (above and below) is blooming.

Cactus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

The flowers are a little over a 1/4″ across.

Cactus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

Cactus in our Kigali garden/enclos*ure

GBBD — the 15th of every month — is hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Click here to see other garden bloggers’ mid-July flowers.


*It was among the bushes on the right in this photo. It was always clipped, so it probably hasn’t bloomed for a long time.

My bargain dahlia

It’s amazing what you can get at Costco.

DSCF1292

I bought a fairly cheap bag of dahlia tubers in mixed varieties there last spring. Then I left it sitting next to my desk until September, when I finally planted the (by then) shriveled-up tubers.

DSCF1293

They came up strong, nevertheless, and this light yellow and burgundy one surprised me; I didn’t remember anything so nice on the photo on the bag (which I had tossed).

The others were more ordinary:  a couple in yellow with just a bit of burgundy streaking, three in solid burgundy, and one in yellow with orange streaks (sent right to the cutting garden).

4a

I put the burgundy- and yellow-flowered plants in the center of the long border along the lower lawn.

5a

Their bi-color streakiness will go well with the red, yellow, and green tropical foliage of the plants pictured above* and with the yellow and green variegated gingers below on the left.

Growing behind the dahlias and blooming all the time is a shrubby Hypericum, possibly H. perforatum or St. John’s wort.

7a

The dahlia plants as a whole are not very pretty at the moment, mainly because I didn’t stake them early enough. I’ve planted two shrimp plants** up front to hide their legginess

9a

. . .eventually.  There’s one in front of the gingers too.  I should be able to maintain them at about 2′ high.

10a

I think the whole yellow and burgundy arrangement will give some drama to this center section — once everything grows a little more.  Those gingers will get at least 12″ taller.

down the border

Above:  looking down the border to the left to a pink and burgundy (dahlias) section –also still in progress — then yellow, purple, and, at the end, red with some pink and blue/purple around the edges.

Click any of the photos for a larger look.


*I think a croton and a coleus.

**Justicia brandegeeana.