The Sunday porch: Cherry Spring, Texas

North (back) side of Rode-Kothe House, Cherry Spring, Gillespie County, Texas, May 29, 1936, by Richard MacAllister for an Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division (all three photos).

South (front) side of house.

The HABS says the limestone house was at least partly built in 1855 by German immigrant Dietrich Rode. (He completed it in 1879.) Rode was one of the founders of nearby Fredericksburg, as well as Cherry Spring.  He was also a lay Lutheran minister and a teacher, first in his students’ homes at night and then on the second floor of his ranchhouse shown here.

Detail of front porch.

The house may still stand near Christ Lutheran Church, which Rode helped found, but I cannot find a current picture of it.

The HABS says the building was “[s]ited to dominate its surroundings.”

Vintage landscape: willow corral

Ninety-Six Ranch corral, Paradise Valley, 1978, Library of CongressMoving cattle into a willow branding corral on Ninety-Six Ranch, Paradise Valley, Nevada, October 1979, by Carl Fleischhauer, via American Folklife Center, Library of Congress (all photos here).

Ninety-Six Ranch willow fence, Paradise Valley, 1978, Library of Congress
Willow corral at Hay Camp on Ninety-Six Ranch, May 1978, by Howard W. Marshall.

Willow corrals are still used on Ninety-Six Ranch. In 2014, Kris Stewart, one of the current owners, told Carl Fleishhauer:

We are concerned with staying with original willow corrals – that is definitely part of Great Basin ranching. They are safer in every way; they have some give to them. And they are the cheapest fencing from a materials standpoint since almost everything is naturally already on the ranch.

Willow corral, Suzi Jone, Library of Congress
Willow corral on Ninety-Six Ranch, July 1978, by Suzi Jones.

The Sunday porch: Paradise Valley

Ranch house porch, 1978, Suzi Jones, Library of CongressRanch House with Porch, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, Nevada, July 1978, (35mm slide) by Suzi Jones, via American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress (all photos here).

The house — of adobe construction — served as the officer’s quarters of Fort Scott in the late 1860s.  In 1978, it was the main residence of Fort Scott Ranch.

Fort Scott Ranch gate, 1978, Library of Congress

There is another view here, by Howard W. Marshall.

The photos here are three of over two thousand taken or collected for the Folklife Center’s 1972-1982 ethnographic field project on the Paradise Valley area. The work became the collection*  “Bucharoos in Paradise: Ranching Culture in Northern Nevada, 1945-1982.”

Fort Scott Ranch, Paradise Valley, NV, Library of Congress
Fort Scott Ranch, by Howard W. Marshall.

There’s another photo of the ranch house and its outbuildings here.

Poll results

For the last two Sundays, I ran a little poll asking how readers look at enclos*ure — 1) on a desktop computer or Mac; 2) on an e-reader; or 3) on a smartphone? Of those who responded, 82% use a desktop and the others use an e-reader.


*It also contains sound recordings and motion picture film.