Little Bendigo

“Woman and children in home garden, Little Bendigo, Ballarat, Victoria, 1876,” by unknown photographer, via The Biggest Family Album in Australia, Museums Victoria Collections on flickr.

Harriet, Caroline, and Harriet Mary Whitaker are shown in front of their home on Lofven Street. (A photo of their neighbors is here.)

Little Bendigo was the site of a small gold rush in the 1860s. It took inspiration from Bendigo, Victoria, an important gold mining boomtown of the 1850s. In 1881, the town’s name became Nerrina.

Fairbanks, Alaska

“Mrs. Brandt’s home, Fairbanks, Alaska,” 1916, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Fairbanks was founded in 1901 as a trading post supplying gold miners in the area.  It became an incorporated city in 1903. “By 1905, [it] had electricity and sewer service, a powerplant, a three-story skyscraper, saloons, stores, police and fire protection, and a thriving “Red Light” district,” according to fairbanks-alaska.com.

This may be the home of Margaret Brandt, a widow who was a city telephone operator from 1905 to 1938.

The photograph is one of over sixteen thousand created or collected by Frank G. Carpenter and his daughter, Frances, to illustrate his geography textbooks and popular travel books.

Click on the image for a larger view.

Vintage landscape: front walk

Alaska cabin, Library of CongressLog cabin in Alaska, probably Fairbanks, between 1900 and 1916, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The photograph is one of over sixteen thousand created or collected by Frank G. Carpenter and his daughter Frances to illustrate his geography textbooks and popular travel books.

There are three more charming Alaska log cabins from the same collection here, here, and here.

Vintage landscape: boxwood path

Rose HillRose Hill, Yanceyville, North Carolina, 1938, by Frances Benjamin Johnston, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Rose Hill, Library of Congress

I like to imagine that front door as yellow.

The house still stands and continues to be owned by the Brown family, who built it in 1800.

You can view larger versions of these photos by clicking on ‘Continue reading’ and then on either thumbnail in the gallery.

Nothing moves in boxwood
where gray soldiers lie.

Dave Smith, from “Winesaps