London, U.K.

moncure-daniel-conway-c-1890-london-house-divided-project-dickinson-college
Moncure Daniel Conway and family at their London home, ca. 1890s, photographer unknown, via House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College.

Moncure Conway (third from the left) was a southern abolitionist, born in Virginia to a prominent slave-owning family and educated at Dickinson. After college, he first became a circuit-riding Methodist minister, but then a crisis of conscience led him to further study at Harvard and ministry in the Unitarian Church. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he undertook a mission to promote the anti-slavery, pro-Union cause to Great Britain. London became his home for most of the rest of his life as he led the nonconformist South Place Ethical Society.

From the mallets in the picture, members of the family seem to have just finished a croquet game. The maid is bringing out tea.

At that moment

Postcard of family in the garden, ca. 1905, via pellethepoet on flickr (under CC license)Pelle’s notes say it was purchased from an eBay seller in Tramore, Waterford, Ireland.

The low-hanging hammock on the left swayed right at the moment the shutter clicked. There are actually two women in the hammock, and there’s a strange blur behind it in the center — probably a child running past. The girl on the grass has tumbled (out of the hammock?), and her legs are up.  On the left, the blond girl on the bench has noticed and looks about to laugh.

For a better look, click on the picture — or on “via” above and then on the larger image there.

Barcaldine, Queensland

“Residence with goat in Yew Street, Barcaldine, Queensland,” ca. 1910, photographer unknown, via State Library of Queensland Commons on flickr.

The man and boy are showing off the goat and cart. A woman on the porch is holding up a painting.

In 1891, the Great Shearers Strike was held in Barcaldine under the boughs of The Tree Of Knowledge. The event led to the formation of the Australian Labor Party. The streets in the town are all named after species of trees.

Nambour, Queensland

The Tambo family posing among the plants in front of their homestead of Malayta Hill near Nambour, Queensland, 1906, by A. W. Newbery, via State Library of Queensland Commons on flickr.

The Tambos were among the tens of thousands of South Sea Islanders who were either kidnapped or recruited to be labourers in the sugarcane fields of Queensland during the mid to late 19th century — or they were their descendants.

At the time of this photo, most Islanders who were still in Australia faced repatriation or deportation by the government under legislation related to the White Australia policy.

The image above was used in an 1906 photo-essay in The Queenslander entitled “The Undesirables – Kanaka* Settlers on the Blackall Range.” “Kanaka” was once a term for the Islanders, now considered offensive. There is little other text that I can find, but the title seems to refer to the process of forced repatriation.

Descendants of those who escaped or were exempted from removal now form the largest Melano-Polynesian ethnic group in Australia.


*It means “man” in the Hawaiian language, according to Wikipedia.