In a vase on Monday: pink in purple

Today, I combined pink calla lilies and small dark pink and yellow mums from the grocery store with yellow shrubby cinquefoil from the yard.


I had meant to take advantage of the lilies’ long stems, but they went mushy before I could make the arrangement, so I ended up with several short pieces.


The little pitcher is from Saturday’s flea market. It has a name very lightly impressed on the bottom, which I think is Schramberg, an old pottery maker from the Baden-Württemberg state of Germany. The mark would put this piece in the mid-1800s. I really liked the purple color.


I also made an arrangement (adding a few sprigs of pink spirea) in another purple transfer ware bowl that I’ve had for several years.


To see what other bloggers have put in a vase today, please visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.

The Sunday porch: Pasadena

So thou dost riot through the glad spring days. . .*

The Sunday porch:enclos*ure -- Pasadena, c. 1902, Library of Congress“Gold of Ophir roses, Pasadena[, California,]” ca. 1902, a photochrom by Detroit Photographic Co., via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The climber Gold of Ophir — also known as Fortune’s Double Yellow and Beauty of Glazenwood — moved to southern California with the settlers and flourished there.

“I remember great heaps of them in every backyard, blazing like moons on fire, yellow, gold, pink. . .,” wrote M. K. Fisher in her introduction to Growing Good Roses by Rayford C. Reddell.


* from “Gold of Ophir Roses” by Grace Atherton Dennen, editor/publisher of The Lyric West

The Sunday porch: Santa Barbara

Vhay house, Santa Barbara CA, 1934, HABS, Library of CongressThe north porch of the Vhay House, 835 Leguna Street, Santa Barbara, California, April 1934, by C. A. Fletcher for an Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.*

Vhay house, Santa Barbara CA, 1934, HABS, Library of CongressThe Rafael Gonzalez House, which was owned by Louise and David Vhay at the time of these photos, was built in 1825.  It is a typical adobe townhouse of the Mexican California period, with walls over 2′ (.61 m.) thick.

Gonzalez was a soldier and landowner when he built the house for his Italian bride. He became mayor or alcalde of Santa Barbara in 1829.  His daughter, Salome, inherited the home in 1866 and lived there until 1923.

The Vhays restored and enlarged the house.  It is now occupied by Randall House Rare Books.

Vhay house, Santa Barbara CA, 1934, HABS, Library of CongressAbove: bougainvillea above and calla lilies below, along the north porch, by C. A. Fletcher.

Vhay HABS, 1934, Library of CongressAbove: north porch, by C. A. Fletcher (cropped by me).

Vhay house, Santa Barbara CA, 1934, HABS, Library of CongressAbove: south porch from the southwest. Photographed April 1934, by H. F. Withey.

Vhay house, Santa Barbara CA, 1934, HABS, Library of CongressAbove: detail of south porch, east end, by H. F. Withey.

Vhay house, Santa Barbara CA, 1934, HABS, Library of CongressAbove: 1934 drawing by Frederick C. Hageman (also the small plan above).

2010 photo by Dilly Lynn, via Wikimedia CommonsAbove:  2010 photo of the Rafael Gonzalez House, now a rare book store, by Dilly Lynn, via Wikimedia Commons.  There’s also a nice painting of the house in 1953 here.

The house was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1970.

.    .    .    — for a sec
he even sees the calla lily’s furl
in the gesture of voilà!

Farnoosh Fathi, from “Sympathy


*All photos and drawings here, except the last image, via Vhay House HABS, Library of Congress.