The Sunday porch: Richmond, Va.

West Clay Street rowhouses, Richmond, Virginia, ca. 1978, by John G. Zehmer, via VCU (Virginia Commonwealth University) Libraries Commons on flickr.

These three late Italianate houses with Eastlake-style ornamental woodwork were built between 1885 and 1890 on the former formal garden of the 1832 Addolph Dill house* —  a corner of which can just be seen on the left side of the picture.

Clay Street is part of the Jackson Ward Historic District. These houses still stand and still have the same beautiful woodwork.  The very little street tree shown above on the right now shades more than all the space shown in the photo.


*Until 2016, it was the Richmond Black History Museum.

The Sunday porch: Montgomery, Alabama

“Early dwelling, 222 S. Perry St.,” Montgomery, Alabama, 1939, by Frances Benjamin Johnstonvia Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The porch woodwork pattern is echoed in the little attic windows. Click to enlarge.

A huge vine is growing beside the steps, but it seems to go up into the tree on the left, rather than onto the porch.

The sidewalk is tiled in a simple geometric pattern. The effect, with the arches of the porch and basement windows, is a little Moroccan/Andalusian.

The house no longer stands.

Oxford Street

Magnolias in Rochester, New York, undated, via  Arthur Peck Collection, OSU Special Collections & Archives Commons on flickr.

Since the late 19th century, Oxford Street in the city’s Park Avenue neighborhood has attracted visitors in May for its display of blooming magnolia trees. There is another vintage picture of the trees here.

Arthur Peck was a Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Oregon Agricultural College* from 1908 to 1948. This picture was part of his teaching library of 24 boxes of glass lantern slides — now in OSU’s archives.


*The college later became Oregon State University (OSU).