The Sunday porch: Mandarin

Harriet Beecher Stowe, her husband, and guests on the porch of her home in Mandarin (Jacksonville), Florida, 1875, via Robert N. Dennis Collection of Stereoscopic Views, The New York Public Library Digital Collections. (Click on the image for a larger view.)

The author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin and 30 other books bought her Florida house soon after the Civil War ended. At the time of this photo, she was there seeking refuge from the publicity accompanying the civil trial for adultery of her equally famous preacher brother, Henry Ward Beecher.

There is another view of the house (no longer standing) here.

Bowling, 1861


“Group of people bowling on a wooden lane erected in a yard,” July 4, 1861, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

I just found this photo. It was taken exactly one year before yesterday’s picture, probably by James Hunter,* who would host the 1862 picnic.

The Library’s online catalogue says that “Mrs. H. Bowling and Coleman Sellers, Jr.,” have been identified in this image, although it doesn’t say where they are — probably the woman bowling (Mrs. H., bowling†) and perhaps the boy in charge of setting up the pins.

The full stereograph. I do hope they removed the baby from the lane before she bowled.

“By the mid-1800s, the game of ninepins was so popular that wealthy families installed bowling lanes at their estates. . . , ” according to American Profile. “When some states outlawed ninepins [in the 1830s and 40s] because it encouraged gambling, the modern game of tenpins evolved to skirt the laws.” I’m not sure if there are nine pins in this picture or ten. What looks like one middle pin may be two pins lined up.

The image is part of the Charles F. Himes collection of stereographs by amateur photographers, primarily members of the Pennsylvania Photographic Society (1860-61) and the Amateur Photographic Exchange Club (1861-63).


*James Hunter may have been co-owner of the Print and Dye Works in Hestonville, Pennsylvania.

†H. for Hunter? Coleman Junior’s father was Coleman Sellers II, a prominent engineer and inventor from Philadelphia. — as well as an amateur photographer.

The Sunday porch: Sogn, Norway

Cafe in Norway, 1898 to 1904, flickr CommonsPossibly a café, Sogn area, Norway, between 1897 and 1904, by Nils Olsson Reppen, via Fylkesarkivet (County Archives) i Sogn go Fjordane Commons on flickr.

Across the road, the sign on the house reads, “Logi for reisende. Udsalg av mad, Kaffe og Brus” (“Lodging for travellers. Sale of food, coffee and fizzy lemonade”).

Click the image for a larger view.

The Sunday porch: ice cream

Day Brothers Ice Cream, nypl.digitalcollections“Waiters at Day and Brothers Ice Cream Saloon,” 1880, Ocean Grove, New Jersey, by William H. Stauffer, via Robert Dennis Collection of Stereoscopic Views, The New York Public Library.

Waiters and ice cream, NY Public Library

The image is not very clear, but it looks like a fun place. The same company still exists at the location shown above as Day’s Ice Cream. It is Ocean Grove‘s oldest continuously operating business.