Boston, Massachusetts

“‘City farmer’ tends garden in the Fenway, administered by the 600-member Fenway Civic Association. Four hundred twenty-five personal gardens are tilled on these five acres in Metropolitan Boston, [Massachusetts],” May 1973, by Ernst Halberstadt, via U.S. National Archives Commons on flickr.

This photo was taken for DOCUMERICA, an early photography program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 

From 1972 to 1977, the EPA hired over 100 photographers to “document subjects of environmental concern.” They created an archive of about 20,000 images. In addition to recording damage to the nation’s landscapes, the project captured “the era’s trends, fashions, problems, and achievements,” according to the Archives, which held an exhibit of the photos, “Searching for the Seventies,” in 2013.

In a vase on Monday: warm weekend

Little flowers picked from our yard (except for the tulip) in the kitchen window. . .

We had a relatively warm sunny weekend, and now the primroses are starting to bloom, and the woods behind the house are full of wood anemones.


In the city, all the platz were full of people soaking up the sun — most still dressed in black winter coats, so it looked like flocks of large crows had settled down on the grass and concrete. The lines for ice cream were very long — Stuttgarters seem to want cones the minute the temperature rises above 55°F (12°C).


We’ve seen three large hares in the neighborhood in as many days, after not seeing any for months. They are hard to miss, being the size of small dogs — largish small dogs. Occasionally when we come upon one, it stands its ground and we always move along first.


To see what other garden bloggers have put in vases today, please visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden. She hosts this Monday meme.

In a vase on Monday: snowdrops


for the first day of spring. . .

“Bouquet of lilies of the plain of Kosovo (snowdrops) . . . on a farm table — Lipljan, Kosovo, (in May, actually) 1913, by Auguste Léon, via Archives of the Planet Collection – Albert Kahn Museum /Départment of Hauts-de-Seine.

This autochrome is one of about 72,000 that were commissioned and then archived by Albert Kahn, a wealthy French banker who was committed to the ideal of universal peace and believed that “knowledge of foreign cultures encourages respect and peaceful relations between nations.”* He was also acutely aware that the 20th century was going to bring rapid material change to the world.

Accordingly, from 1909 to 1931, Kahn sent thirteen photographers and filmmakers to 50 countries “to fix, once and for all, aspects, practices, and modes of human activity whose fatal disappearance is no longer ‘a matter of time.'”†  The resulting collection is called Archives de la Planète and now resides in its own museum at Kahn’s old suburban estate at Boulogne-Billancourt, just west of Paris. Since June 2016, the archive has also been available for viewing online here.

I wasn’t able to make my own flower arrangement this week for the Monday meme “In a vase on Monday,”‘ but to see what other garden bloggers have created today, please visit host Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.


*Collections Albert Kahn website. Also, the above photo (A 1902) is © Collection Archives de la Planète – Musée Albert-Kahn and used under its terms, here.
†words of Albert Kahn, 1912.

Vintage landscape: three deer. . .

deer in cemetery garden, Japan, 1910, U.ofVictoria, flickr“. . . standing on road in (cemetery) garden [in Japan]; large flowering cherry trees, evergreens and stone monuments,” ca. 1910, a hand-tinted glass-plate slide, via University of Victoria Libraries Commons on flickr (both photos).

(Click on the images to enlarge them.)

A commenter on the flickr page thought this was the pathway to the Kasuga Shrine in Nara.

deer in cemetery garden 2, Japan, 1910, U.ofVictoria, flickr“Group of deer feeding on lawn in wooded garden; stone monuments and summer house in mid-ground.”