The Sunday porch: Cascadia, Oregon

Hotel in Cascadia, Oregon, 1925, via Gerald W. Williams Collection, OSU (Oregon State University) Special Collections & Archives Commons on flickr.

I love that rustic bench on the right side of the porch. (Click on the image to enlarge it.)

George Geisendorfer opened a resort at Cascadia Springs in 1896, offering what he called the “curative powers” of the local mineral spring water. The resort included a hotel, garden, croquet course, tennis courts, and bowling alley. After the hotel burned, the 300-acre property was acquired by the state of Oregon and is now the site of Cascadia State Park.

The Sunday porch: Centerville, Calif.

Japanese-American grandmother on porch 1942, U.S. National Archives“Grandmother of farm family awaits evacuation bus. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration,” May 9, 1942, by Dorothea Lange for the U.S. War Relocation Authority, via U.S. National Archives on flickr.

Centerville is a community in northern California. All along the Pacific coast — from 1942 to January 1945 — over 110,000 people of Japanese heritage were forced into internment camps.  Sixty-two percent were American citizens.

In 1988, in the Civil Liberties Act, the U.S. Government admitted that its actions had been based on “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership.”