Zion path

It’s National Trails Day.
Trail, Zion Natl Park, Utah, 1980s, Library of CongressDetail of the West Rim Trail, looking southwest, Zion National Park, Washington County, Utah, 1984, by Clayton B. Fraser, via Historic American Engineering Record, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The trail opened in 1926 and was paved in 1929 with oil mixed with sand and rock.  It was later repaved in concrete, most recently in 2007.

“Built of native stone and associated with the “National Park Service-Rustic” architectural style, the West Rim Trail possesses architectural integrity,” says the Record.  “Rock used in the masonry switchback walls was quarried locally and shaped as little as possible to provide a rough appearance, yet stable construction.”  You can read more here.

The Sunday porch: Bon Echo

Bon Echo cabin, Cloyne & District Historical SocietyRustic birch lattice on the porch of the North Cottage of the Bon Echo Inn, near Cloyne, Ontario, 1935, via Cloyne and District Historical Society Commons on flickr (both photos).

The Bon Echo Inn was established in 1889 on Mazinaw Lake.  It attracted wealthy guests who were also tea-totalers, as the religious owners did not serve alcohol.  Later, it was purchased by a founder of the Canada Suffrage Association, who made it into a retreat for artists and writers, notably James Thurber. In 1936, the Inn and many of its outbuildings were destroyed by fire and never rebuilt.  The surrounding area is now Bon Echo Provincial Park.

Bon Echo Inn, Cloyne & District Historical SocietyTea service on the verandah of the Inn, between 1920 and 1936.

Vintage landscape: front walk

Alaska cabin, Library of CongressLog cabin in Alaska, probably Fairbanks, between 1900 and 1916, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The photograph is one of over sixteen thousand created or collected by Frank G. Carpenter and his daughter Frances to illustrate his geography textbooks and popular travel books.

There are three more charming Alaska log cabins from the same collection here, here, and here.

The Sunday porch: Silver Lake

Log House, Akron, Ohio, via Miami University, flickr“Log house at Silver Lake, Akron, Ohio,” between 1905 and 1909, by Illustrated Post Card Co., via Walter Havighurst Special Collections, Miami University Libraries Commons on flickr.

.  .  . I care less and less
about the shapes of shapes because forms
change and nothing is more durable than feeling.

Terrance Hayes, from “What it Look Like