Vintage landscape: red fence

Buckingham house, 1978, Suzi Jone, Library of CongressBuckingham Residence, Paradise Valley, Nevada, July 1978, (35mm slide) by Suzi Jones, via American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress (all photos here).

The house, the oldest in the town, was originally built as a hotel for a mining settlement. It was later disassembled and rebuilt in Paradise Valley.

Photo by Carl Fleishhauer.
May 1978 slide by Carl Fleishhauer.

White Fence

Also from the Folklife Center’s Paradise Valley* collection. . .

White fence, Paradise Valley, Library of Congress
The Stock-Stewart house, October 1979, by Carl Fleischhauer.

This residence on the Ninety-Six Ranch was built around 1900, added onto a bunkhouse/dining hall from the 1880s (shown below).

Ninety-Six Ranch house gate, Paradise Valley, 1978, Library of Congress
Ox yoke and wagon wheel entrance to Stock-Stewart house, July 1978, by Howard W. Marshall.

The ranch has been in the same family’s ownership since 1864. The ox yoke above the gate may have had particular significance for them, as their ancestor — a German immigrant named William Stock — first saw the land while hauling freight from California.

There are other views of the home here and here.

Grey fence

One more picket fence image from the same collection. . .

Main residence, Ferraro Rance,
Main residence, Ferraro Ranch, November 1979, by William Smock.

The house was built by Stefano Ferraro, an Italian immigrant who bought the ranch land in 1902. It is still family owned.

The Folklife Center's notes say the cottonwood trees, planted by Stephano, "were among the tallest in the valley." Also by William Smock.
Backyard view, by William Smock.

According to the Folklife Center’s notes, the cottonwood trees that were planted behind the house by Stephano “were among the tallest in the valley.”

There is a 1934 view of the home here.


*From 1978 to 1982, the Center conducted an ethnographic field project in this distinctive ranching and mining community. The study became the collection “Buckaroos in Paradise: Ranching Culture in Northern Nevada, 1945-1982.”

The Sunday porch: Airlie, N.C.

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“Miss Lula Thorne’s house,” Oakland Plantation, Airlie in Halifax County, North Carolina, between 1935 and 1938, by Frances Benjamin Johnston, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Beautiful vines and interesting columns.  And I really like the four small sconces — one on each side of the door and one at each corner.

There were similar vines and sconces on this other North Carolina house here.

Oakland house was probably built between 1823 and 1828 for Elizabeth Williams Thorne Drake and either her first or second husband. It still stands, but, at some point after the 1930s, the porch was rebuilt to match the late Federal “temple form” style of the rest of the house. You can see it about 2012 here and here.

 

The Sunday porch: somewhere in Texas

The Sunday porch/enclos*ure: unidentified Texas porch, by Fanny Ratchford, 1936, via Texas State Archives Commons.“Unidentified house,” probably by Fanny Ratchford, 1936, via Texas State Archives Commons on flickr. (You can click on the photo to enlarge it.)

It’s interesting to me that the roof of the house extends beyond the edge of the porch. The pretty columns are not attached to the railings, but come down to the ground a few feet beyond them.

There seems to be a word — maybe a name — on the wall above the chair on the left side, but I can’t read it.

ADDENDUM: The way the columns are set makes this a rain porch.

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Among a little wind grit, in a grid on a grid, somewhere
like the crossroads of outer space and Earth, Texas,
a handful of ragged elms withstand a long sway
of heat and wind. These old guards of a home haunt
the field but wither even as ghosts must. Honor them
with a walk among homesick bricks, and prophesy good.

John Poch, from “The Llano Estacado

The Sunday porch: Sherrill Inn

1 Sherrill Inn, North Carolina, 1938, via Library of CongressSherrill Inn, Hickory Nut Gap, Buncombe County, North Carolina, in 1938, by Frances Benjamin Johnston, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division (all photos here).

I know, and even better. . .

1a Sherrill Inn, North Carolina, 1938, via Library of CongressThis is what’s behind the boxwoods. (There’s another photo of this section of the porch here.)

In the nomination form for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places, the porch columns were described thusly:

The porch is supported by gracefully tapered posts each rising without interruption from rectangular bases to approximately balustrade level, where it is quickly cinched in on all four sides; above, the post gently flares out to original width near eye level and then back in, until near the top the taper reaches its conclusion to flare quickly into a cap for the porch roof supporting plate to rest upon.

2bb Sherrill Inn, North Carolina, 1938, via Library of Congress

At the corner of the L-shaped porch,

2 Sherrill Inn, North Carolina, 1938, via Library of Congress

. . .the boxwoods cover the slope like giant boulders.

2a Sherrill Inn, North Carolina, 1938, via Library of Congress

And below is the porch after the turn,2b Sherrill Inn, North Carolina, 1938, via Library of Congress

2ba Sherrill Inn, North Carolina, 1938, via Library of Congress

and a view of the mountains.5a Sherrill Inn, North Carolina, 1938, via Library of Congress

A bit of heaven.

Best of all, it seems that most of the old boxwoods are still in place.  The property is being run as an organic farm by descendants of the McClures, the couple who owned the Inn when Johnston took these photos.

Pictures of a beautifully styled wedding held at the Inn in recent years show it to have been in loving hands over the decades.

The house began as two log structures, possibly built by 1806 or maybe even earlier.  Between 1839 and 1850, Bedford Sherrill connected and enlarged those buildings to make an inn for travelers on the “Hickory Nut Turnpike,” an early stage route to western North Carolina.

There are many more details about the history and design of the house and grounds here.