The Sunday porch: Cascadia, Oregon

Hotel in Cascadia, Oregon, 1925, via Gerald W. Williams Collection, OSU (Oregon State University) Special Collections & Archives Commons on flickr.

I love that rustic bench on the right side of the porch. (Click on the image to enlarge it.)

George Geisendorfer opened a resort at Cascadia Springs in 1896, offering what he called the “curative powers” of the local mineral spring water. The resort included a hotel, garden, croquet course, tennis courts, and bowling alley. After the hotel burned, the 300-acre property was acquired by the state of Oregon and is now the site of Cascadia State Park.

Nambour, Queensland

The Tambo family posing among the plants in front of their homestead of Malayta Hill near Nambour, Queensland, 1906, by A. W. Newbery, via State Library of Queensland Commons on flickr.

The Tambos were among the tens of thousands of South Sea Islanders who were either kidnapped or recruited to be labourers in the sugarcane fields of Queensland during the mid to late 19th century — or they were their descendants.

At the time of this photo, most Islanders who were still in Australia faced repatriation or deportation by the government under legislation related to the White Australia policy.

The image above was used in an 1906 photo-essay in The Queenslander entitled “The Undesirables – Kanaka* Settlers on the Blackall Range.” “Kanaka” was once a term for the Islanders, now considered offensive. There is little other text that I can find, but the title seems to refer to the process of forced repatriation.

Descendants of those who escaped or were exempted from removal now form the largest Melano-Polynesian ethnic group in Australia.


*It means “man” in the Hawaiian language, according to Wikipedia.

The Sunday porch: Puebla, Mexico

Veranda restaurant of the Hotel Diligencias, Puebla, Mexico, between 1880 and 1897, by William Henry Jackson, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division (both photos).

The veranda seems to go around the second floor of an internal courtyard.

I believe this is the same eating area from the other side.

Puebla was once a layover point for those traveling between Veracruz and Mexico City. In the 1880s, Jackson had a commission to take photographs of the Mexican Central Railroad.