The Sunday porch: wedding party

Sanders-Eckles wedding party, Lincolnville, Florida, ca. 1925, from the Richard Twine Collectionvia Florida Memory (State Archives and Library of Florida) Commons on flickr.

Lincolnville is an historically African-American neighborhood of St. Augustine. It was established after the Civil War, in 1866, by several freedmen and women who leased the land for $1 a year.  By the 1880s, it had begun to grow and “was characterized by narrow streets, small lots, and houses built close to the street line, similar to the colonial St. Augustine style and land-use pattern,” according to Wikipedia. By the 1930s, it was an important subdivision of the city in size and in political participation of its residents, and by the 1960s, it drew national attention for its role in the Civil Rights Movement.

In 1991, Lincolnville was listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its many late Victorian Era buildings and its place in African-American history. It is now known as the Lincolnville Historic District.

In a vase on Monday: 1888

Tea Room at the Crawfordsburn Inn, Crawfordsburn, County Down, ca. 1888, by R. Welch, via Public Record Office of Northern Ireland Commons on flickr.

I believe this is The Old Inn, built in 1614 and still in operation as a hotel and restaurant. The mail coach, on its way to the port of Donaghadee and passage to England, changed horses at the Inn. Among the travelers who stopped here were Swift, Tennyson, Thackeray, Dickens, and Trollope.

I’m recovering from foot surgery at moment, so I haven’t been able to make my own arrangement for “In a vase on Monday,” hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.  But I did want to share this wonderful photo in which the whole room is an arrangement.  At first, I thought those were peacock feathers fanning out over the portrait of the Queen and on the right, but they are tall grasses.  I would love to have lunch here.

Please click on the picture for a larger view.

The Sunday porch: Montgomery, Alabama

“Early dwelling, 222 S. Perry St.,” Montgomery, Alabama, 1939, by Frances Benjamin Johnstonvia Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The porch woodwork pattern is echoed in the little attic windows. Click to enlarge.

A huge vine is growing beside the steps, but it seems to go up into the tree on the left, rather than onto the porch.

The sidewalk is tiled in a simple geometric pattern. The effect, with the arches of the porch and basement windows, is a little Moroccan/Andalusian.

The house no longer stands.

The winter garden: Montreal

notman-house-1933-montreal-mccord-museumSt. Margaret’s Home, Montreal, 1933, via Notman Photographic Archives, McCord Museum Commons on flickr.

At the time of the photo, the house — built in 1845 — was a small hospital run by the Anglican Sisters of St. Margaret.  It still exists today and is called Notman House for photographer William Notman who lived there in the late 19th century.

I really covet those plant supports between the windows.

The Sunday porch: Jericho

rae-family-home-christmas-1918-victoria-australia-via-museums-victoriaRae family home with fern fronds as Christmas decorations, Jericho, Victoria, Australia, ca. 1918, via Museums Victoria Collection.

Jericho was a gold mining town, established in the 1860s. The local tree ferns resembling palm trees were said to remind early settlers of the biblical Jericho.  By 1918, the old settlement was well into a decline, and its last buildings were destroyed by a bush fire in 1939.