London, U.K.

moncure-daniel-conway-c-1890-london-house-divided-project-dickinson-college
Moncure Daniel Conway and family at their London home, ca. 1890s, photographer unknown, via House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College.

Moncure Conway (third from the left) was a southern abolitionist, born in Virginia to a prominent slave-owning family and educated at Dickinson. After college, he first became a circuit-riding Methodist minister, but then a crisis of conscience led him to further study at Harvard and ministry in the Unitarian Church. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he undertook a mission to promote the anti-slavery, pro-Union cause to Great Britain. London became his home for most of the rest of his life as he led the nonconformist South Place Ethical Society.

From the mallets in the picture, members of the family seem to have just finished a croquet game. The maid is bringing out tea.

Vintage landscape: Lacock Abbey

Lady's Elizabeth's, 1840s, Museum of Photographic Arts“Lady Elisabeth’s Rose Garden, Lacock [Abbey], England,” early 1840s, by William Henry Fox Talbot, via Museum of Photographic Arts Commons on flickr (both photos).

Lady Elizabeth Fox-Strangways Feilding was the photographer’s mother.

Lady's Elizabeth's rose garden, 1840s, Museum of Photographic Arts

Talbot was one of the early fathers of photography.  He developed the paper negative and the process of permanently fixing photos on chemically treated paper.

This is the body of light. . . .

— Ronald Johnson, from “BEAM 30: The Garden

Vintage landscape: Ambleside

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Ambleside, stepping stones, Lake District, England,” ca. 1890 – ca. 1900, a photochrom print by Detroit Publishing Co., via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Addendum: Below, two more views of the same type of stream crossing. . .

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“Abbey stepping stones, . . . Bolton Abbey, England,” ca. 1890 – ca. 1900, photochrom prints by Detroit Publishing Co., via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The three images are from the Library’s photochrom collection “Views of the British Isles.”