In a vase on Monday: London

Last week, we were in London, and, walking around Whitehall, I discovered the 18th century Blewcoat School building and this beautiful botanical display.

I thought I would share it for today’s “In a vase. . .,” since I haven’t been able to buy flowers, and nothing is blooming in the yard (although I think I will see primroses along the fence by next week).


The building now houses a fancy bridal shop, Ian Stewart.


Why the use of onions, I’m not sure — they do seem to be cooking onions and not ornamental Alliums. There may be a connection to unity and wholeness (round, concentric layers).  One website said onions were once given as marriage presents during the Middle Ages.

A chair covered in twigs.

At the side of the building.

To see what other bloggers have put in a vase today, please visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.

Topiary seat

Interesting garden seat, France, Library of Toulouse:flickr

Deux femmes assises dans un jardin” (two women sitting in a garden), France, between 1859 and 1910, by Eugène Trutatvia Bibliothèque de Toulouse Commons on flickr.

On this clipped green throne, she could take in the sun and still be protected from the chilly winter or early spring breezes.

We can make do with so little, just the hint
of warmth, the slanted light.

Molly Fisk, from “Winter Sun

Salute to early spring

Our mid-March, mostly spent in Washington, D.C., has been more like April this year, and I saw a few dandelions popping up. (And the famous cherry trees — 100 years old this year — are already at their peak.)

Dandelions on meadowland by the Thames by Rod Allday, via Wikipedia under CC license.

The Dandelion’s pallid tube
Astonishes the Grass,
And Winter instantly becomes
An infinite Alas —

The tube uplifts a signal Bud
And then a shouting Flower, —
The Proclamation of the Suns
That sepulture is o’er.

Emily Dickinson