In a vase on Monday: warm weekend

Little flowers picked from our yard (except for the tulip) in the kitchen window. . .

We had a relatively warm sunny weekend, and now the primroses are starting to bloom, and the woods behind the house are full of wood anemones.


In the city, all the platz were full of people soaking up the sun — most still dressed in black winter coats, so it looked like flocks of large crows had settled down on the grass and concrete. The lines for ice cream were very long — Stuttgarters seem to want cones the minute the temperature rises above 55°F (12°C).


We’ve seen three large hares in the neighborhood in as many days, after not seeing any for months. They are hard to miss, being the size of small dogs — largish small dogs. Occasionally when we come upon one, it stands its ground and we always move along first.


To see what other garden bloggers have put in vases today, please visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden. She hosts this Monday meme.

In a vase on Monday: snowdrops


for the first day of spring. . .

“Bouquet of lilies of the plain of Kosovo (snowdrops) . . . on a farm table — Lipljan, Kosovo, (in May, actually) 1913, by Auguste Léon, via Archives of the Planet Collection – Albert Kahn Museum /Départment of Hauts-de-Seine.

This autochrome is one of about 72,000 that were commissioned and then archived by Albert Kahn, a wealthy French banker who was committed to the ideal of universal peace and believed that “knowledge of foreign cultures encourages respect and peaceful relations between nations.”* He was also acutely aware that the 20th century was going to bring rapid material change to the world.

Accordingly, from 1909 to 1931, Kahn sent thirteen photographers and filmmakers to 50 countries “to fix, once and for all, aspects, practices, and modes of human activity whose fatal disappearance is no longer ‘a matter of time.'”†  The resulting collection is called Archives de la Planète and now resides in its own museum at Kahn’s old suburban estate at Boulogne-Billancourt, just west of Paris. Since June 2016, the archive has also been available for viewing online here.

I wasn’t able to make my own flower arrangement this week for the Monday meme “In a vase on Monday,”‘ but to see what other garden bloggers have created today, please visit host Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.


*Collections Albert Kahn website. Also, the above photo (A 1902) is © Collection Archives de la Planète – Musée Albert-Kahn and used under its terms, here.
†words of Albert Kahn, 1912.

The winter garden: Iceland

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The living room of Sigurjóns, carpenter, and his wife, Elin, at Vonarstræti 8, Iceland (possibly Reykjavik), between 1910 and 1930, by Magnús Ólafssonvia The Reykjavik Museum of Photography Commons on flickr (both photos).

I believe you can just see Sigurjóns beyond the doorway in one of the images. Elin must be the woman in traditional dress, and the other woman may be their daughter.

I don’t know if this photo was really taken in winter or not, although the tulips on the table could have come from a greenhouse in February.

In a vase on Monday: roses

roses 9, July 2016, enclos*ure
These white, yellow, and pink roses came from bushes that were in our garden when we moved into the house, and last summer they looked a bit sad and didn’t produce many flowers. But I mulched them well with fallen leaves in autumn and continuously fed them my used coffee grounds over the winter. Then, we had a lot of rain this spring and June, and, finally, some sun and warmth in July, so when we got back from France on Friday each bush had several open blooms.

roses 7, July 2016, enclos*ure
The arrangement’s color combination, however, while cheerful in the living room, wasn’t very pretty in my pictures, so I switched to black and white.

To see what other garden bloggers have put in vases today, please visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden. She hosts this Monday meme.

And if you voz to see my roziz
As is a boon to all men’s noziz —
You’d fall upon your back and scream —
“O Lawk — O crikey! It’s a dream!”

— Edward Lear