Verneuil-le-Chétif, France


“Procession at the cemetery of Verneuil-le-Chétif” (Sarthe, Pays de la Loire), France, November 2, 1920, by Roger Dumas, via Archives of the Planet Collection – Albert Kahn Museum /Département des Hauts-de-Seine.

The image is labeled “2 novembre,” but I wonder if it was actually taken the day before, on All Saints’ Day, a day for visiting family graves and leaving chrysanthemums.

This autochrome is one of about seventy-two thousand that were commissioned and then archived by Albert Kahn, a wealthy French banker and pacifist, between 1909 and 1931. Kahn sent thirteen photographers and filmmakers to fifty countries “to fix, once and for all, aspects, practices, and modes of human activity whose fatal disappearance is no longer ‘a matter of time.'”* The resulting collection is called Archives de la Planète and now resides in its own museum at Kahn’s old suburban estate at Boulogne-Billancourt, just west of Paris. Since June 2016, the archive has also been available for viewing online here.


*words of Albert Kahn, 1912. Also, the above photo (A 24 573 X) is © Collection Archives de la Planète – Musée Albert-Kahn and used under its terms, here.

Beauvais, France

Wreaths laid in remembrance of World War I dead by the British army and navy, Beauvais, France, October 7, 1930, by Stéphane Passet, via Archives of the Planet Collection – Albert Kahn Museum /Département des Hauts-de-Seine.

This autochrome is one of about seventy-two thousand that were commissioned and then archived by Albert Kahn, a wealthy French banker and pacifist, between 1909 and 1931. Kahn sent thirteen photographers and filmmakers to fifty countries “to fix, once and for all, aspects, practices, and modes of human activity whose fatal disappearance is no longer ‘a matter of time.'”* The resulting collection is called Archives de la Planète and now resides in its own museum at Kahn’s old suburban estate at Boulogne-Billancourt, just west of Paris. Since June 2016, the archive has also been available for viewing online here.


*words of Albert Kahn, 1912. Also, the above photo (A 64 781) is © Collection Archives de la Planète – Musée Albert-Kahn and used under its terms, here.

A show of mums

The Library of Congress labels this photo “Agriculture Department Dahlia Show,” 1911, but I’m sure it’s from the USDA’s annual Chrysanthemum show, which was held in one of the Department’s greenhouses in Washington, D.C.

The show in 1917.

The first of the annual exhibitions opened in October of 1902. I haven’t been able to find out anything more about them, but they were still being held in 1937.

In 1917.

All the photos here are by Harris & Ewing, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Between 1915 and 1923.
In 1917.
Also 1917.

My advice to the women of America is to raise more hell and fewer dahlias.

William Allen White (1868 – 1944)

I’m sure the same applied to mums.

In a vase on Monday: pink in purple

Today, I combined pink calla lilies and small dark pink and yellow mums from the grocery store with yellow shrubby cinquefoil from the yard.


I had meant to take advantage of the lilies’ long stems, but they went mushy before I could make the arrangement, so I ended up with several short pieces.


The little pitcher is from Saturday’s flea market. It has a name very lightly impressed on the bottom, which I think is Schramberg, an old pottery maker from the Baden-Württemberg state of Germany. The mark would put this piece in the mid-1800s. I really liked the purple color.


I also made an arrangement (adding a few sprigs of pink spirea) in another purple transfer ware bowl that I’ve had for several years.


To see what other bloggers have put in a vase today, please visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.