The Sunday porch: sewing circle

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“House Verandah. Mother, Winifred, Helen & Mrs Kingsmill,” Deseronto, Ontario, July 1908, via Harold McMurrich Rathbun’s Negatives album, Deseronto Archives Commons on flickr.

The Rathbuns were a prominent family in Deseronto.  About the time of this photo, The Rathbun Company owned a local shipyard and saw mill and a number of other businesses. At least two of its men had served as mayor around the turn of the 20th century. However, markets changed, woods stock were depleted, and fires destroyed their docks and other property. “[The] core timber and minerals resource businesses were dead by 1916 . . . . The company surrendered its charter in 1923,” according to Wikipedia.

Life in gardens: roof garden

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“Yonge St. Mission, Mr. & Mrs. J. C. Davis on roof garden,” Toronto, July 29, 1924, via The Globe and Mail Collection (Fond 1266, Item 3318), City of Toronto Archives.

John Coolidge Davis founded the Yonge Street Mission in the 1890s, handing out food and clothing to the poor from a “gospel wagon.” In 1904, the Mission purchased the building at 381 Yonge Street, now called the Evergreen Centre for Street Youth.

Life in gardens: the boys

mrs-gordons-boys-1907-montreal-musee-mccord“Mrs. Gordon’s boys,” Montreal, 1906, by Wm. Notman & Son, via McCord Museum Common on flickr.

The boys’ father was a wealthy businessman and banker, and their garden encompassed five acres. Next door, another four acres were owned by their uncle and aunt, Harriet Brooks Pitcher. She was an early nuclear scientist who contributed to the discovery of radon and worked briefly with Marie Curie.

The winter garden: Montreal

notman-house-1933-montreal-mccord-museumSt. Margaret’s Home, Montreal, 1933, via Notman Photographic Archives, McCord Museum Commons on flickr.

At the time of the photo, the house — built in 1845 — was a small hospital run by the Anglican Sisters of St. Margaret.  It still exists today and is called Notman House for photographer William Notman who lived there in the late 19th century.

I really covet those plant supports between the windows.