Life in gardens: geography lesson

Life in gardens/enclos*ure: geography lesson, ca. 1920, State Library of New South Wales“[S]chool yard, Jindalee Primary School, [Cootamundra, Australia,] c. 1920s,” photographer unknown; via State Library of New South Wales Commons on flickr.

The children have made a map of the world in dirt. It includes cut-out ships and animals.

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The Sunday porch: Airlie, N.C.

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“Miss Lula Thorne’s house,” Oakland Plantation, Airlie in Halifax County, North Carolina, between 1935 and 1938, by Frances Benjamin Johnston, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Beautiful vines and interesting columns.  And I really like the four small sconces – one on each side of the door and one at each corner.

There were similar vines and sconces on this other North Carolina house here.

Oakland house was probably built between 1823 and 1828 for Elizabeth Williams Thorne Drake and either her first or second husband. It still stands, but, at some point after the 1930s, the porch was rebuilt to match the late Federal “temple form” style of the rest of the house. You can see it about 2012 here and here.

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Vintage landscape: Yorktown, Va.

More big (boxwood) love.  .  .

#1, Nelson Hse. garden, ca. 1930, FBJohnston, LoC“‘York Hall,’ Captain George Preston Blow house, . . . Main Street, Yorktown, Virginia. Table in boxwood garden,” 1929, by Frances Benjamin Johnston.*

The house is more often called the Nelson House for the family that built it in the 1740s and owned it throughout the 19th century.  George and Adele Blow purchased it and began to restore it in 1914.  In 1968, it became a National Park Service site.

#2, Nelson hse., 1903, WHJackson, LoCThe front of the house and Main Street as it appeared about 1902. Photo by William Henry Jackson for Detroit Photographic Co.

#4, Nelson Hse., c. 1915, HABS, LoC The front of Nelson House in 1915. This photo is part of an Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS).

(There’s a photo of the front of the house and the younger boxwoods in 1862 here.)

#5, Nelson Hse., c. 1915, HABS, LoCThe front door, inside the boxwood hedge, 1915, HABS.

#9, view from hall, Nelson house, ca. 1915, LoCThe center hall, looking out the front door, 1915, HABS (photo cropped by me).

#6, Nelson Hse., c. 1915, HABS, LoCThe side view of the house, ca. 1915 (I think it may be later), HABS.  The front boxwood hedge is on the left.

#16, Nelson Hse, ca. 1930s, FBJohnston, LoCThe side garden in the 1930s by Frances Benjamin Johnston.

The garden during the Blow’s ownership was designed by Charles Freeman Gillette, a landscape architect known for working in the Colonial Revival style. Today, little remains.  The giant boxwoods at the front of the house are gone.

#19, Nelson Hse, ca. 1930s, FBJohnston, LoCAnother view of the side garden in the 1930s by  Frances Benjamin Johnston.

More big boxwood photos here and here and here and here.

*All photos here via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

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Life in gardens: the backdrop path

Trutat family on path, E. Trutat, Library of Toulouse, flickrPaul Trutat at Cornusson, France, by his father, Eugène Trutat. All photos here via Bibliothèque de Toulouse Commons on flickr.

Do you have a favorite outdoor spot for taking family photographs?

For early French photographer Eugène Trutat (1840 – 1910), it seems to have been this garden path, which was in Cornusson, a village in the Parisot commune in the Midi-Pyrénées.

The property may have been part of the family home of his wife, Caroline Cambe. The couple were married in Cornusson in 1864.  Paul (above) was born in 1865 and Henri in 1868.

(There’s a sweet picture of the two little boys together here.)

Eugène was from Toulouse.  In addition to being a photographer, he was a naturalist, geologist, mountaineer of the Pyrénées, and a curator of the Museum of Toulouse.

Trutat family on path, E. Trutat, Library of Toulouse, flickrCaroline (née Cambe) in a man’s suit.  I believe this was taken between 1859 and 1870.

Trutat family on path, E. Trutat, Library of Toulouse, flickrCaroline and her mother, ca. 1864- ca. 1875.

Trutat family on path, E. Trutat, Library of Toulouse, flickrExtended family group. If the boys in the picture are Paul and Henri, then the date is probably about 1871-75.

Trutat family on path, E. Trutat, Library of Toulouse, flickrDetail of above photo.

Trutat family on path, E. Trutat, Library of Toulouse, flickrJeanne and Henriette, (household servants?), between 1859-1910.

Trutat family on path, E. Trutat, Library of Toulouse, flickrWomen’s headdress, Jeanne and Clémence, between 1859-1910.

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July Bloom Day: my caladium

Sorry, I’m a day late for Bloom Day. . .

caladium bloom

The most interesting blooms in the garden this month are on my caladium, almost entirely hidden underneath its leaves.

caladium leaves

I never considered that caladiums could bloom — I think their showy leaves are usually thought of as substitutes for flower color.  However, when they do, online advice says to cut off the spathes to keep all nutrients going to the leaves.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is the 15th of every month. To see what’s blooming this week in other bloggers’ gardens, visit Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Follow Up is today, the 16th of every month. Check out more beautiful leaves at Digging.

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