Wordless Wednesday: baskets

Wordless Weds./enclos*ure: Rwandan baskets

Wordless Weds./enclos*ure: Rwandan baskets . . . of Gashora, Rwanda.

Wordless Weds./enclos*ure: Rwandan baskets

Wordless Weds./enclos*ure: Rwandan baskets

(Click on any thumbnail below to scroll through larger images.)

(Previous Rwandan baskets: here)

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Life in gardens: Rochester, N.Y.

Rochester, NY, c. 1910, via George Eastman House Collection“Schoolchildren with teachers under Magnolia trees on Oxford* Street,” c. 1910, an autochrome by Charles C. Zoller, via George Eastman House Collection on flickr.

Click on the photo to get a better look.  I like the outfits, particularly that of the little girl on the far right.

The Collection describes the process of making an autochrome like this:

After decades of wishing for a practical color process, photographers were thrilled when Auguste and Louis Lumière announced the invention of the autochrome process. . . in 1904. The process used a screen of tiny potato starch grains dyed orange-red, green and violet. Dusted onto a glass plate, the dyed grains were covered with a layer of sensitive panchromatic silver bromide emulsion. As light entered the camera, it was filtered by the dyed grains before it reached the emulsion. While the exposure time was very long, the plate could be processed easily by a photographer familiar with standard darkroom procedures. The result was a unique, realistic, positive color image on glass that required no further printing.

*Commenters on the image’s flickr page thought the cross street in the picture was either Harvard St. or Brighton St.

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Life in gardens: Easter Monday

Life in gardens/enclos*ure: may pole dancing at WH, 1929, Library of CongressMay pole dance at the White House Easter Egg Roll, Monday, April 1, 1929, National Photo Company Collection, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

First Lady Lou Hoover added may pole and folk dancing to the annual event — but only briefly.  Apparently, the Depression was bad enough on its own.

(If you click on the photo and enlarge it, you can see the wonderfully fierce expression of one of the girls on the right side.)

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The Sunday porch: April 1865

The Sunday porch/enclos*ure: McLean house, Appomattox, VA, April 1865, via Library of CongressThe McLean house, Appomattox Court House (previously Clover Hill), Virginia, April 1865, by Timothy H. O’Sullivan, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division (all photos here).

On Palm Sunday, April 9, 1865, General Robert E. Lee crossed the porch of this house and entered the parlor to surrender his army to Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant — effectively ending the American Civil War.

Detail of photo above.

Detail of photo above.

The house — built in 1848 and previously a tavern — was owned by Wilmer McLean, a retired major in the Virginia militia and a wholesale grocer.

Back in 1861, the first major battle of the war had been fought on McLean’s farm in Bull Run, Virginia. (A cannonball had landed in the kitchen fireplace, and afterwards the house was taken over as a Confederate hospital.)

The Sunday porch/enclos*ure: McLean house, Appomattox, VA, April 1865, via Library of Congress

Hoping to avoid the rest of the war,* the McLeans moved to the small southern Virginia village of Clover Hill in 1863. However, during Easter Week of 1865, the family not only hosted the surrender signing, but also the Surrender Commissioners’ meeting the next day.  Union Major General John Gibbon and his officers then quartered in the house for a few days.

“The [Civil] War began in my front yard and ended in my parlor,” McLean is reported to have said later.

One can well imagine that he sometimes sat on this porch, reflecting and shaking his head.

Detail of photo above.

Detail of photo above – possibly the McLean family.  Mrs. McLean had two daughters from an earlier marriage and at least three children with Wilmer.

As soon as the surrender was signed, officers of the Army of the Potomac began buying the family’s furniture (whether they wanted to sell or not). Major General Philip Sheridan paid $20 for the little table on which Grant signed the document of surrender terms. George Armstrong Custer took it away on his horse, and Sheridan later gave it to Mrs. Custer, who bequeathed it to the Smithsonian Institution.

That fall, McLean, nearly bankrupt, moved away from the “Surrender House,” as it was now popularly called. He was found in default of his loans, and the house was sold by the bank.

In 1891, it was sold again to Captain Myron Dunlap, who, with other investors, formed several schemes to profit from the fame of the house.  By 1893, it was dismantled to become a tourist attraction in Washington, D.C. However, the money ran out before it could be shipped. For 50 years, the pieces were just left on the ground, exposed to the elements, vandals, and thieves.

In 1949, the house was reconstructed on its original site and opened to the public by the National Park Service. There are recent photos of the house and yard here and here.

The Sunday porch/enclos*ure: McLean house, Appomattox, VA, April 1865, via Library of Congress

*McLean was 47 when the war began and was considered too old to fight. A slave owner, he made a lot of money running sugar through the Union blockade. Unfortunately, it was Confederate money, which was worthless by 1865.  After moving away from Appomattox, the family returned to Bull Run and then later settled in Alexandria, Va. McLean worked for the Internal Revenue Service from 1873 to 1876 and died in 1882.

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Vintage landscape: Union Square

Vintage landscape/enclos*ure: buying Easter flowers, NYCity, 1908, via Library of CongressBuying Easter flowers, Union Square, New York City, April 18, 1908 (the Saturday before Easter) by Bains News Service, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Vintage landscape/enclos*ure: buying Easter flowers, NYCity, 1908, via Library of Congress

Vintage landscape/enclos*ure: buying Easter flowers, NYCity, 1908, via Library of CongressThings look pretty calm in these pictures, but only a week and a half before, on March 28, the park was the scene of a demonstration by the unemployed and then a bombing, which killed the bomber and a bystander.

Vintage landscape/enclos*ure: buying Easter flowers, NYCity, 1908, via Library of CongressSince 1976, Union Square has been the site of a thriving greenmarket (every Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday), which includes flower sellers.

Vintage landscape/enclos*ure: buying Easter flowers, NYCity, 1908, via Library of Congress

You can scroll through larger versions of these images (and several more) by clicking on ‘Continue reading’ below and then on any thumbnail in the gallery.

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