Los Angeles

arthur-peck-collection-c-1920-los-angelos-osu-on-flickr

Collegiate Institute, Los Angeles, California, ca. 1920, a hand-colored glass lantern slide, via Arthur Peck Photograph Collection, OSU Special Collections & Archives Commons on flickr.

Arthur Peck was a Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Oregon Agricultural College* from 1908 to 1948. This picture was part of his teaching library of 24 boxes of glass lantern slides — now in OSU’s archives.

I like the hose left out on the grass in this otherwise very neat picture. It would illustrate to a class the major problem in maintaining a lawn in Southern California.

Unfortunately, I can’t find anything about a “Collegiate Institute” in Los Angeles.


*The college later became Oregon State University (OSU).

The winter garden: amaryllis

Amaryllis4, McCall flower portraits, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of AlbertaAmaryllis, Alberta, Canada, ca. 1930, hand-colored glass lantern slide by William Copeland McCalla, via Provincial Archives of Alberta Commons on flickr (all images here).

Amaryllis2, McCall flower portraits, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of Alberta

The photographer, William McCalla, was interested in botany and photography from an early age. He studied at Cornell University in the early 1890s and later worked in western Canada as a farmer, librarian, and Natural History teacher.  While teaching from 1925 to 1938, he made over 1,000 lantern slides of plants and animals as visual aids.

Amaryllis1, McCall flower portraits, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of Alberta

The slides were donated to the Archives by his son and granddaughter in 1982 and 2007.

Amaryllis3, McCall flower portraits, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of Alberta

Life in gardens: wildflowers

5 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum LibraryChildren costumed as flowers or insects for an event of the Wild Flower Preservation Society, Illinois Chapter, probably in a Chicago park, ca. 1920, hand-colored glass lantern slides by an unknown photographer, via The Field Museum Library Commons on flickr (all images here).

6 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum Library

The Wild Flower Preservation Society of America was founded in 1902 with money given to the New York Botanical Garden by Olivia E. and Caroline Phelps Stokes.  The funds were to be used for the protection of native plants.

1 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum Library

The Society dissolved in 1933, but much of its work was taken up by the Garden Club of America and by another Wild Flower Preservation Society, founded in 1925 in Washington, D.C. (which seems no longer to exist).

2 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum Library

3 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum Library

4 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum Library

7 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum Library

12 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum LibraryAbove and below: Mayapples.9 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum Library

10 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum LibraryAbove: a bee.

13 Child:ren in wildflower costumes, Chicago, ca. 1920, The Field Museum Library
Click here to see several more of the slides.

Vintage landscape: portraits

McCall flower portrait 13, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of Alberta“Early Double Tulip: Van de Hoeff,” Alberta, Canada, ca. 1930, hand-colored glass lantern slide by William Copeland McCalla, via Provincial Archives of Alberta Commons on flickr (all images here).

McCall flower portrait 17, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of AlbertaFritillaria Pudica Spreng – Yellow or Mission Bell.”

The photographer, William McCalla, was interested in botany and photography from an early age. He studied at Cornell University in the early 1890s and later worked in western Canada as a farmer, librarian, and Natural History teacher.  While teaching from 1925 to 1938, he made over 1,000 lantern slides of plants and animals as visual aids.

The slides were donated to the Archives by his son and granddaughter in 1982 and 2007.

McCall flower portrait 2, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of Alberta“Cross-section of poppy capsule.”

McCall flower portrait 9, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of Alberta“How Violets scatter their seeds: capsule open: [capsule] empty.”

McCall flower portrait 16, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of Alberta“Trillium sessile: Californicum wats.”

McCall flower portrait 12, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of Alberta“Gladiolus Star of Bethlehem.”

McCall flower portrait 14, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of Alberta“Mountain Ash.”

McCall flower portrait 15, ca. 1930, Provincial Archives of Alberta“Phlox Drummondii.”

You can see more of McCalla’s beautiful flower portraits here.