Vintage landscape: Biloxi, Mississippi

Montross Hotel, Biloxi, Miss
Hotel de Montross (or Montross Hotel), Biloxi, Mississippi, ca. 1900, via Cooper Postcard Collection, Mississippi Department of Archives and History Commons on flickr.

Because of its waterfront location, Beloxi has been a summer resort town since the first half of the 1800s. The Hotel de Montross — facing the Mississippi Sound — was one of its oldest hotels. Today, it is long gone, with a Hard Rock Hotel and Casino located on approximately the same spot.

(There’s another picture of the hotel’s grounds here.)

The Sunday porch: Bon Echo

Bon Echo cabin, Cloyne & District Historical SocietyRustic birch lattice on the porch of the North Cottage of the Bon Echo Inn, near Cloyne, Ontario, 1935, via Cloyne and District Historical Society Commons on flickr (both photos).

The Bon Echo Inn was established in 1889 on Mazinaw Lake.  It attracted wealthy guests who were also tea-totalers, as the religious owners did not serve alcohol.  Later, it was purchased by a founder of the Canada Suffrage Association, who made it into a retreat for artists and writers, notably James Thurber. In 1936, the Inn and many of its outbuildings were destroyed by fire and never rebuilt.  The surrounding area is now Bon Echo Provincial Park.

Bon Echo Inn, Cloyne & District Historical SocietyTea service on the verandah of the Inn, between 1920 and 1936.

Life in gardens: natural light

Marilyn and Elizabeth, Museum of Photographic Arts

Elizabeth and Marilyn Watson, probably in the Berkeley, California, area, 1921, by Dorothea Lange, via Museum of Photographic Arts Commons on flickr (both photos).

Marilyn and Elizabeth 2, Museum of Photographic ArtsAbove, Marilyn Watson; in both photos, the sisters seem to be under a grape arbor. Below, they are with their mother, May V. Landis Watson, still outdoors, I believe.

Watson family, D. Lange, Museum of Photographic Arts

In 1921, Lange was 26 years old and running her own portrait studio in Berkeley. She had many well-to-do clients, as the Watsons appear to be. Ten years later, she would begin the work that made her famous: capturing the faces of the Great Depression and of the WWII internment of Japanese-Americans.

There’s a little clip from a PBS documentary on Lange here. It shows a number of her early photographs.