Category Archives: plants

Wordless Wednesday: and a pear tree

Agr. plaqueDepartment of Agriculture (National Mall side), Washington, D.C.

dept. of agr.plaque 2

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The Sunday porch: work space

Porch and chair w/ tatted cover and tatting tools, L. Rosskam, Library of Congress, 1940“Chair with tatted cover and tatting tools. Middlebury, Vermont,” July 1940, by Louise Rosskam, via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

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October Bloom Day: Washington, D.C.

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On this Bloom Day, I thought I would share some photos that I took this week of the remaining flowers and various seed heads in one of my favorite gardens in the city, the Smithsonian Institution’s Butterfly Habitat Garden.

(You can see more of the Butterfly Garden here.)

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is the 15th of every month. To see what’s blooming around other garden bloggers, visit Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

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Wordless Wednesday: tall fennel

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Cannon Beach, Oregon, yesterday.

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The Sunday porch: The Appletrees

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“The Appletrees,” Henry Eugene and Eva Johnston Coe house, Southampton (on Long Island), New York, 1914, by Frances Benjamin Johnston,* via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The porch of this 19th century “cottage” is actually an arbor — covered, I believe, in grape vines.  The flower-filled boxwood parterre immediately surrounding the house ends rather abruptly in country fields and woods.

I haven’t been able to discover much about the property and its owners:  Mrs. Coe co-authored a book on American embroidery samplers, and Mr. Coe was evidently considered an arbiter of social acceptance for the wealthy Southampton of his time. He signified who was in and who was out by issuing (or not) invitations to his annual dinner at The Appletrees (or The Apple Trees).

I could not find out whether the house still exists.

This hand-colored glass lantern slide was used by Johnston in her  garden and historic house lectures.

*Photographed when Frances Benjamin Johnston and Mattie Edwards Hewitt worked together.

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